Historic Paris Climate Agreement Ratification becomes official, now it's time for action

By Ramona du Houx

Thanks to leadership from President Barack Obama, on October 4, 2016 the Paris Climate Agreement cleared a major hurdle as the European Union voted to join the United States, China, India and other nations in ratifying the agreement.  

The climate agreement has two requirements before it can go into effect: It must be ratified by 55 nations, and the ratifying countries must account for 55 percent of the world's greenhouse gas emissions.

With representatives from the 28 European Union member countries voting 610 to 38 in favor of the agreement, nations now representing more than 55 percent of the world’s global warming pollution have signed on – crossing the minimum threshold for the agreement to become official.

Under the agreement, global leaders have committed to limit global warming to no more than 2 degrees Celsius with an aspirational goal of 1.5° C, a benchmark scientists say is critical to avoid the most dangerous impacts of global warming –  including disruption of our food supply, increasingly extreme weather, and loss of coastal regions to flooding.

The planet has already warmed nearly 1° C above the 20th century average, and scientists have warned that urgent, wide-scale action will be required to stop temperatures from rising much further. 

“We’re thrilled that global leaders have moved quickly to ratify this important agreement to preserve our climate. It sends a strong signal that the world plans to do more, faster to protect our communities, our families and our future," said Anna Aurilio, Global Warming Solutions Program Director for Environment America.

Now it's time for the nations around the world to take action for everyone's future. The impacts of global warming are being felt worldwide and represent life threatening situations for millions. 

"Here in the United States, we must redouble our efforts to reduce – and eventually eliminate – global warming pollution. President Obama has already put America on track to slash emissions from vehicles and power plants, but we can and must do much more," said Aurillio. "Here in Maine, Governor LePage should act to accelerate our transition to clean electricity by doubling the strength of the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) to further limit global warming pollution from power plants."

RGGI is the first mandatory market-based program in the United States to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. RGGI is a cooperative effort among the states of Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Rhode Island, and Vermont to cap and reduce CO2 emissions from the power sector.

The program, first started in Maine when Governor John Baldacci pushed for it’s implementation and had a bill introduced. The legislation won unanimous support in Maine’s Senate and House. To date RGGI has brought in $81,837,449.15 to the state for weatherization and alternative energy projects, for businesses and homes. RGGI is a model for countries around the world.

“RGGI is working. It is helping Mainers reduce our energy bills and reduce emissions. It is a win-win and a model for the entire nation," said Former State Representative Seth Berry, who sat on Maine’s legislative committee that approved the final RGGI rules.

The world has the tools to shift away from dirty and dangerous fossil fuels towards a 100 percent renewable energy future powered by solar, wind, and energy efficiency. And while contries implement their stratigies- thousands of jobs will be created.