Goodby Columbus Day, Maine changes name to Indigenous Peoples' Day

 

Maine Governor Mills signs Law to establish Indigenous Peoples’ Day

By Ramona du Houx

On April 26, 2019 Maine tribal leaders and representatives, joined Governor Janet Mills while she signed the law establishing Indigenous Peoples’ Day in Maine.

LD 179 An Act To Change the Name of Columbus Day to Indigenous Peoples’ Day,  sponsored by Representative Benjamin Collings of Portland, passed with bipartisan support in the Legislature.

“Our history is by no means perfect. But, for too long, it has been written and presented in a way that fails to acknowledge our shortcomings,” said Governor Janet Mills. “There is power in a name and in who we choose to honor. Today, we take another step in healing the divisions of the past, in fostering inclusiveness, in telling a fuller, deeper history, and in bringing the State and Maine’s tribal communities together to build a future shaped by mutual trust and respect.”

"On behalf of the Penobscot Nation and with all the Wabanaki and Indigenous People of Maine in our hearts we thank the Maine State Legislature, especially Representative Benjamin Collings and the bill's cosponsors and supporters, and Governor Mills for this significant act,” said Ambassador Maulian Dana of the Penobscot Nation. 

“It shows a true intent to honor the Indigenous Nations of our State and brings all citizens to an elevated understanding and reconciliation of our shared history.  I also want to thank all those involved in the efforts over the past few years to make these changes in towns and municipalities, they brought these important discussions to light and the conversations had a ripple effect all the way to the honorable law makers of Maine. We are graciously appreciative of this measure that reflects a state that feels more welcoming and inclusive.  As the original stewards of these lands and waters we are happy that our ancestral ties and contributions are validated and celebrated instead of silenced and ignored by the previous holiday that glorified the attempted genocide of our Nations. Our past can be painful but our present and future can be brighter with acts of unity and honesty."  

“I was privileged to bring this bill forward on behalf of Maine’s tribal community,” said Representative Collings, D-Portland. “Maine’s tribes have played a vital role in building our state and will continue to influence our future. I am grateful to Gov. Mills for signing this bill today and paying tribute to those who truly deserve it.”

Governor Mills was joined at the signing ceremony by Representative Collings, Representative Rachel Talbot Ross, Chief Clarissa Sabattus of the Houlton Band of Maliseets, Chief Marla Dana and Vice Chief Maggie Dana of Pleasant Point, Chief William Nicholas and Representative Rena Newell of the Passamaquoddy Nation, Ambassador Maulian Dana and former Chief Barry Dana of the Penobscot Nation, and former state Representative and Senior Advisor on Tribal Affairs to the Governor, Donna Loring. 

Maine now joins Vermont, New Mexico, Alaska, South Dakota, Oregon, Minnesota and Hawaii in replacing Columbus Day with Indigenous Peoples’ Day. More than 130 cities and towns, including Starks, Orono, Bangor, Portland, Gouldsboro, Belfast and Brunswick in Maine, have also made the change.

LD 179 was cosponsored by Senator Carpenter of Aroostook, Representative Cardone of Bangor, Representative Maxmin of Nobleboro, Representative Newell of the Passamaquoddy Tribe, Representative O’Connor of Berwick, Representative Perry of Calais, Representative Reckitt of South Portland, Representative Rykerson of Kittery and Representative Talbot Ross of Portland.