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  • Two-day examination of the history and legacy of slavery in Maine

    Award-winning author and speaker Shay Stewart-Bouley will speak at the Holocaust and Human Rights Center of Maine (HHRC) Wednesday, August 7 as part of a two-day examination of the history and legacy of slavery in Maine.  

    The HHRC is hosting teachers from across the state for a two-day training on teaching about slavery.  On Wednesday evening, the HHRC will host Shay Stewart-Bouley as a keynote speaker for lecture for teachers and the public titled “It’s Not Over: Slavery Then, Racism Now.”

    “White supremacy breeds violence as we have seen in the tragic shootings over the weekend. White supremacy and racism today is rooted in our past history of slavery,” said HHRC Executive Director Shenna Bellows.  “We all have a responsibility to educate ourselves and work to confront racist attitudes and rhetoric. This training and lecture are concrete ways to become educated and mobilized to confront white supremacy in our schools and communities.”

    The teacher training will be Wednesday, August 7 and Thursday, August 8 from 9 to 4.  It is the fourth training conducted by the HHRC for teachers this summer. Earlier trainings included Holocaust education, immigration and anti-bias. Guest lecturers at the training on teaching about slavery in Maine will include a national expert from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture, Kate McMahon, and Rep. Rachel Talbot Ross (D-Portland) who is a long time civil rights leader in Maine.  “It’s Not Over: Slavery Then, Racism Now” featuring McMahon and Stewart-Bouley will take place at 6 pm on Wednesday, August 7.

    Shay Stewart-Bouley is a nationally recognized author and speaker on race relations, social justice and white supremacy and the Executive Director of Community Change, Inc., a Boston-based civil rights organization. Living in Maine since 2002, Shay runs the award-winning blog, Black Girl in Maine. Shay holds an undergraduate degree from DePaul University, where she self-designed a program to focus on African-American health and wellness and health disparities; she also holds a Master of Education degree from Antioch University New England.

    All programs are being held at the Michael Klahr Center on the campus of the University of Maine at Augusta, 46 University Drive, Augusta, Maine.  The Michael Klahr Center is open to the public Monday through Friday 8 to 4 and houses permanent exhibits dedicated to the history of Holocaust survivors who came to Maine after WWII.

    The Holocaust and Human Rights Center of Maine is a non-profit organization that promotes universal respect for human rights through outreach and education. Using the lessons of the Holocaust and other events past and present, the HHRC encourages individuals and communities to reflect and act upon their moral responsibilities to confront prejudice, intolerance and discrimination.

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